Are You Overstriding?

 

Here’s our latest gait analysis showing an overstriding foot strike. Interestingly, this runner only overstrides with his left leg which is the side of most of his injuries. Luckily we caught this biomechanical deficiency and corrected it pretty quickly. To fix an overstriding gait, we monitor and tweak cadence (amount of steps per minute) and start with drills to practice proper foot placement. Overstriding or improper foot placement can create some of the very common running injuries such as foot pain, knee pain, and hip pain.

More Gait Analysis

This gait analysis study I am particularly excited about. This runner was not in any pain when she presented to our office, she just felt like things were “off”. We were able to get to the cause and solution of the altered gait immediately and the corrections will go a long way to prevent future injuries. Have a look:

Pre/Post Gait Analysis With Voiceover

If you’re a biomechanics or anatomy nerd like myself, you’ll think this video is really cool. This is the format for which I conduct gait analysis studies in my office. Here I outline a bit what we’re looking for and more importantly, how we correct it. There is voiceover so be sure your sound is on. The measurements on the left are from before I made recommendations on corrective exercise and treatment. The measurements on the right were made after just two days of corrective exercise and one treatment. The results were significant.

What’s the blue tape?

One of the primary goals at Kentucky Sports Chiropractic is to not only get you better, but enable you to continue your active lifestyle WHILE getting better. One of the tools we use to help you do this is called Kinesio tape. You may remember our last summer Olympics where athletes in several sports wore the weird looking tape on their shoulders and knees. This was Kinesio tape.

Kinesio Taping gives support and stability to your joints and muscles without affecting circulation and range of motion. It is also used for Preventive Maintenance, Edema, and to treat pain.

Kinesio Taping is a technique based on the body’s own natural healing process. This Kinesio Taping exhibits its efficacy through the activation of neurological and circulatory systems. This method basically stems from the science of Kinesiology, hence the name “Kinesio”. Muscles are not only attributed to the movements of the body but also control the circulation of venous and lymph flows, body temperature, etc. Therefore, the failure of the muscles to function properly induces various kinds of symptoms.

The Kinesio Taping Method is applied over muscles to reduce pain and inflammation, relax overused tired muscles, and to support muscles in movement on a 24hr/day basis. It is non-restrictive type of taping which allows for full range of motion.

In contrast, traditional sports’ taping is wrapped around a joint strictly for stabilization and support during a sporting event obstructing the flow of bodily fluids as an UNDESIRABLE side-effect.

Dana, DCCF’s writer in residence blogs about her experience with Kinesio tape here.

-KB

Training for the Triple Crown or Mini? Make a foam roller or “The Stick” your best friend to avoid injury.

With the Louisville Triple Crown running series and Mini-marathon upon us, the very common overuse injuries that runners ¬†experience are starting to rear their ugly heads. I’ve been seeing a lot of shin splints, plantar fasciitis, IT band syndrome, patellofemoral pain (runner’s knee), and lower extremity muscle strains lately. What a lot of people don’t know is that these injuries can be prevented in a few simple ways.

First, let’s go over the anatomy of what’s going on when we have these issues. Overused muscles are the culprit for a lot of these conditions. A muscle becomes overused in three ways:

-Acute injuries (pulls, tears, collisions, etc.)

– Accumulation of small tears (micro-trauma)

– Not getting enough oxygen (hypoxia)

So now the question is: “How do I keep these things from occurring?” One major key to this answer is to make a foam roller or “The Stick” part of your everyday warm-up and cool-down routine.

The foam roller (pictured above on the left) is a form of myofascial release that increases blood flow and oxygen to the treated area which will prepare the muscle for activity. Post-run, rolling will help flush out any inflammation that has occurred during activity and prevent adhesion or scar tissue from forming on overused tissue.

“The Stick” (pictured above on the right) works similarly to the foam roller and might be a little easier for transport and on-the-go treatment.

Taking 5 or 10 minutes a day to roll or stick your muscles will go a long way in preventing these very common overuse injuries.

If you have any questions, feel free to post them in the comment section.

-KB