What is EPAT?

EPAT photo

EPAT (extracorporeal pulse activation technology) is a type of treatment that I’m extremely excited to be adding to our practice. Before this past Christmas I received a phone call from my great friend and colleague, Dr. Brad Wiest. Dr. Wiest helps run the Carolina Sports Clinic in Charlotte, NC and is an official chiropractor of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers. During the phone call, Brad mentioned to me a new type of treatment they had started administering in their clinic. He said with this new type of treatment, they were seeing much quicker recovery rates with certain soft tissue injuries and that I needed to give it a try. I listened, tested the treatment on 16 of the most difficult injuries I’d been seeing in my office, and after very good success decided to add it to our treatment arsenal. So far, we’ve had plantar fasciitis, achilles tendinopathy, knee pain, shoulder pain, calf pain, hamstring pain, and back pain ¬†all respond extremely well. We are proud to be the only facility in Kentucky to offer this type of treatment. A bit more about EPAT:

EPAT Therapy FAQ’s

What is EPAT?

EPAT is an acronym for Extracorporeal Pulse Activation Technology. It is a highly effective, non-invasive, office based treatment that accelerates healing of injured tissues. EPAT has a proven success rate equal to or better than other treatment methods, including surgery, without the risks or long recovery. It is performed in your physician’s office without the need for anesthesia.

How does EPAT work?

EPAT utilizes a unique set of acoustic pressure waves delivered through a special applicator focused on the site of pain or injury. These pressure waves stimulate the metabolism, enhance blood circulation, and accelerate the natural healing process.

Is EPAT safe?

EPAT is a safe, FDA approved treatment with virtually no side effects. It has been used to relieve the pain of millions of patients worldwide.

What conditions can be treated with EPAT?

EPAT can be used to treat many painful soft tissue injuries. Including: plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, patellar tendinitis, quadriceps tendinitis, tendon insertional pain, acute and chronic muscle pain, and myofascial trigger points.

When will my pain subside?

Most patients will experience pain relief after 3 treatments, but some patients report immediate pain relief after only one treatment. Over 80% of patients report less pain or no pain after EPAT therapy. Treatment sessions take approximately 15 minutes per injured area, but may vary depending on the injury. Usually three treatment sessions are necessary and are performed once every 7-10 days. If you are improving after the first three treatments but are not yet pain free, up to 5 treatments may be necessary.

How is EPAT performed?

Ultrasound gel is applied over the skin of the area to be treated. The pressure waves are then delivered using a special applicator tip which is moved over the injured area.

What are the possible side-effects of EPAT?

EPAT is a non-surgical treatment with virtually no risks or side effects. In some cases patients may experience some minor discomfort which may continue for a few days and/or the skin may become bruised or red after treatment.

Who should not have EPAT?

EPAT should not be used in patients who have deep venous thrombosis or malignancy. It is also best to avoid the procedure if you are taking blood thinners.

Will my insurance pay for EPAT?

Unfortunately, insurance companies do not pay for EPAT, though the cost of EPAT can often be reimbursed from a qualified health savings account.

Where Can I Get More Information About EPAT?

Dr. Bowling at Kentucky Sports Chiropractic in trained in providing EPAT treatment and is the best person to speak with.

EPAT photo (2)

Training for the Triple Crown or Mini? Make a foam roller or “The Stick” your best friend to avoid injury.

With the Louisville Triple Crown running series and Mini-marathon upon us, the very common overuse injuries that runners ¬†experience are starting to rear their ugly heads. I’ve been seeing a lot of shin splints, plantar fasciitis, IT band syndrome, patellofemoral pain (runner’s knee), and lower extremity muscle strains lately. What a lot of people don’t know is that these injuries can be prevented in a few simple ways.

First, let’s go over the anatomy of what’s going on when we have these issues. Overused muscles are the culprit for a lot of these conditions. A muscle becomes overused in three ways:

-Acute injuries (pulls, tears, collisions, etc.)

– Accumulation of small tears (micro-trauma)

– Not getting enough oxygen (hypoxia)

So now the question is: “How do I keep these things from occurring?” One major key to this answer is to make a foam roller or “The Stick” part of your everyday warm-up and cool-down routine.

The foam roller (pictured above on the left) is a form of myofascial release that increases blood flow and oxygen to the treated area which will prepare the muscle for activity. Post-run, rolling will help flush out any inflammation that has occurred during activity and prevent adhesion or scar tissue from forming on overused tissue.

“The Stick” (pictured above on the right) works similarly to the foam roller and might be a little easier for transport and on-the-go treatment.

Taking 5 or 10 minutes a day to roll or stick your muscles will go a long way in preventing these very common overuse injuries.

If you have any questions, feel free to post them in the comment section.

-KB